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1st Annual Jehangir Saleh Lecture at Ryerson University – Professor Havi Carel – The Art of Wellbeing: Living with Illness

OnTuesday October 27th, 2015 at 4:30PM in Toronto, Canada our keynote speaker,Our keynote speaker, Professor Havi Carel of the University of Bristol, one of the world’s leading experts on the phenomenology of illness, delivered the 1st  Annual Jehangir Saleh Lecture at Ryerson University.  Her talk was entitled The Art of Wellbeing: Living with Illness

Professor Carel discussed the experience of illness and why it matters. Illness matters deeply to how we live our life not only when unwell, but also when healthy.  She presented an analysis of the experience of illness, drawing on phenomenology, and in connection with Jehangir Saleh’s writing. She touched on the relationship between illness and happiness and discuss the importance of illness to philosophy.

 

View the Video Recording of the lecture
View  Photos from the lecture
View the Facebook event page
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Jehangir Saleh Lecture Series

 

 

Event Details
Tuesday October 27th, 2015

4:30-7:00PM, Keynote speaker at 5:00PM
Heaslip House, Ryerson University
The G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education
7th floor, Bronfman Learning Centre Room
297 Victoria Street
Toronto, ON M5B 1W1, Canada

Located: 1 block east of Yonge Street, just north of Dundas Street
Closest subway stop: Dundas Station
Campus Map 

About the Lecture Series

The Jehangir Saleh Annual Lecture at Ryerson was established at Ryerson University to honour the memory, life and work of Jehangir Saleh, who died from cystic fibrosis in June 2013.   Jehangir was a curious, creative and inspirational philosophy student who dedicated his time and work to the idea of ‘opening up’ and understanding chronic illness, finding strength in adversity and establishing creative and inclusive communities of understanding and support. He was unfailing in seeking to find true meaning in every encounter and relationship and he fostered a strong and deeply memorable sense of shared community among cystic fibrosis patients, families, caregivers and clinicians. His strong sense of shared community extended well beyond those connected to cystic fibrosis or the experience of chronic illness to also include a wide circle of dedicated and diverse friends seeking to learn from life and each other.

This lecture series has been established to continue Jehangir’s work and to explore the following broad themes: the meaning of chronic illness and disability, the social framing of illness as hardship, the human significance of adversity in all forms and, finally, the finding of meaningful ways to overcome adversity, through diverse and creative ways of sharing, music, art, connection and community.

Contributing to the Lecture

Donate to the Jehangir Saleh lecture series 

2nd Annual Jehangir Saleh Lecture at Ryerson University – Professor Kay Toombs – Living Well in the Face of Illness

On Tuesday September 27th, 2016 at 5:30PM in Toronto, Canada our keynote speaker, Professor Kay Toombs of Baylor University delivered the 2nd Annual Jehangir Saleh Lecture at Ryerson University.  It was a talk entitled Living Well in the Face of Illness.

View the Video Recording of the lecture
View  Photos from the lecture
View the Facebook event page
View The EventBrite site
View the Ryerson Event link

Jehangir Saleh Lecture 2016

Event Details
Tuesday September 27th, 2016

5:30-8:00PM, Keynote speaker at 6:00PM
Heaslip House, Ryerson University
The G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education
7th floor, Bronfman Learning Centre Room
297 Victoria Street
Toronto, ON M5B 1W1, Canada

 

About the Lecture Series

The Jehangir Saleh Annual Lecture at Ryerson was established at Ryerson University to honour the memory, life and work of Jehangir Saleh, who died from cystic fibrosis in June 2013.   Jehangir was a curious, creative and inspirational philosophy student who dedicated his time and work to the idea of ‘opening up’ and understanding chronic illness, finding strength in adversity and establishing creative and inclusive communities of understanding and support. He was unfailing in seeking to find true meaning in every encounter and relationship and he fostered a strong and deeply memorable sense of shared community among cystic fibrosis patients, families, caregivers and clinicians. His strong sense of shared community extended well beyond those connected to cystic fibrosis or the experience of chronic illness to also include a wide circle of dedicated and diverse friends seeking to learn from life and each other.

This lecture series has been established to continue Jehangir’s work and to explore the following broad themes: the meaning of chronic illness and disability, the social framing of illness as hardship, the human significance of adversity in all forms and, finally, the finding of meaningful ways to overcome adversity, through diverse and creative ways of sharing, music, art, connection and community.

Contributing to the Lecture

Donate to the Jehangir Saleh lecture series 

Ideas

Ideas
By: Jehangir Saleh
Written: June 7, 2005

•How is it that the Imam or the Pope hold their responsibility – how do they wake up in the morning and go to the bathroom, and shave? How does the Imam sleep with his wife? What does his wife think of him?
•A silverfish crawls across the ceiling. I want to kill it, but am afraid to touch or see it’s carcass. I hate silverfish. Sometimes I close my eyes and try to will them to all die on the spot, wherever they are, like the fundamentalist wills to anyone who does not believe.
•No one has every told me they didn’t want me to die. When I mention it, usually in passing, the response is usually to change the subject, be positive. Occasionally, there is an awkward silence where the other person seems to consider their own morality. But no one has every looked at me as said, Gee, I’m really sorry. I don’t want you to die.
•I cried a lot when my cat died. He was a street cat, never wanted to be trapped in the house. At the end of his life, he was shedding fur like a decrepit rug that was stain from years of raising children. He had bloody patches on his skin that looked like vomit stains. During his last days, he kept coming to my doorstep and waiting there. I don’t know what he was waiting for. I often wonder if he knew he was going to die. My sister didn’t think so, but surely he was conscious of something.
•The hospital smells. I hear all the nurses complaining about it. I can’t know myself because I have lost my sense of smell. I can only try to remember what things smell like, and I imagine a combination of sanitation products and dirty, sickly bodies.
•The worse part is to be out of options. In countries where doctors can prescribe suicide pills, most of those prescripts go unfilled.
•Suddenly my parents who all their lives are uncreative, suddenly imagining options that everyone knows to be impossible. But it’s the only way for us to stop feeling trapped – to feel we have choices, even those, if you really stop and think about it, you’re already on your set course. And you’re going to die. I’ll pause here while you try to imagine ways of proving me wrong.
•I am scared to tell this story. Because it is about me. Both of us know that once it is started, it must somehow end. At least one of us knows what the end will be like.
•Fragments, at least at this moment, seem so useless.

Toes

Toes
Written: May 21, 2001
By: Jehangir Saleh

If I were a dying mite
And God looked down upon me
And inquired:
Where shall you live your last hours?
I would beg
And plead
My only wish
To have myself
Crumble away
On a dolphin blue slate
And warm, promising skin.
Surrounded by the wonderfulness
That is you.